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on johnson, and one of the things he talked about i find very interesting, is the transition of power from, of course, kennedy, to johnson, and the fact that was such a seamless transition because you had this horrible event, and suddenly -- and the government doesn't crumble. and of course, when that is going on, i, who lived in the 19th century, think about the lincoln assassination, and the transition at that particular time to another johnson, andrew johnson, from tennessee, who was put on lincoln's ticket in 1864 election. i don't think anyone would have thought -- maybe they did -- lincoln was always thinking more of the thought, understandably but that andrew johnson would be president, there was a great deal of talk he was drunk at the inauguration, so, there was a transition which was right after -- days after -- it's hard to imagine -- days after appomattox. days after the war, and some in the south were actually still fighting. they didn't want to stop fight, and andrew johnson is the next president, and a lot of knee. congress, called the radical republicans, they looked to joh
. in 1991, basketball star magic johnson announced he was h.i.v. positive. many assumed it would kill him. he's still going strong today. >> now when a person is diagnosed with h.i.v. if they have access to health care, stable housing, they can live a normal life span. >> activists say diagnosing and treating infections early can help to control the virus. these days there's a test people can buy and use at home. it's hoped it will reach 20% of americans who don't know that they are infected. despite advances like these, changes remain. >> h.i.v. is disproportionately affected. these people experience discrimination. that continues to include gay men of all races, women of colour, transgender women and people who inject drugs. >> there are troubling numbers. more men are having unprotected sex with other men. blacks make up nearly half the americans living with h.i.v. his panics one in five. bobby says he contracted the virus by abusing drugs and sharing dirty needles. he says getting treatment was tough because he was homeless. >> it was hard to worry about going for a doctor when you we
your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >> health care manufacturer johnson & johnson will pay to sell civil allegations. >> i expect this from you, johnson, but not you, johnson. to be honest, i have not trusted johnson & johnson since i tried to stop my child's crying with the no more tears shampoo in his eyes. did not work. >> the 113th hasn't passed the bills every congress does like a highway bill or defense bill or farm bill or a budget. what do we need a budget for? clearly not for highways, defense, or food. congress did pass a bill ensuring that people can fish near dams on the cumberland river and also passed deep cuts in food stamps if are the poor which is good solid governing because the poor don't need food stamps anymore now that they can fish near dams on the coupler withland river. >> time to talk about what we learned. we learned a lot. i learned you can catch a munch kin in your mouth if it is delivered right. >> it's not good. really bad in my case. we have a champion. is donut hole capture in chief. >> he's good at it. >> it should surpri
company, coca-cola, kodak. so it was okay to do business in south africa. it was fine. linden johnson said he was one with the african regime. it was only nixon the same, it was only jimmy carter who said the united states is a different kind of engage. with countries like south africa, angola, et cetera. reagan then pushed back. so you can imagine, reagan was very popular, you know, in sort of main stream opinion. they did engage in arms struggle. they were like non-violent. it's very difficult to sell that. the cold war is going on. you can use that as a bogey to say they support it. you can see by the clip, they support it by the soviet union. i think what happens here if i was watching it from outside, i water a teenager at the time. you are getting the word in the united states on college campuses the african-americans underestimate how hard it was to get people here to realize that this wasn't just struggle and a moral struggle through church groups had began to complain and point out these contra dictions, insisting on this economic angle. because what reagan did was to use the cold
'll put the topics on the table for senator ron johnson of wisconsin who will be visiting us in studio today. >>> "squawk" goes shopping. we're going to find out if more consumers are starting to hit the mall. "squawk box" begins right now. >> good morning. welcome back to "squawk box." i'm andrew ross sorkin along with becky quick and joe kernan. the new american airlines group begins trading today under the the tickle -- ticker -- >> tickle? >> tickle me elmo. the merger between american airlines -- >> that's freudian. i'm going to come over and tickle you. >> closes this morning after a last-ditch appeal by consumer groups to delay the deal was denied by the supreme court. i'm sorry about that one. and the ceo of the combined airline, doug parker's going to join us next hour right here on "squawk box." and we're going to talk to him all about this tickling deal. >>> dow component mcdonald's will be a stock to watch. reporting november sales in about an hour from now. analysts surveyed by the street account think that comparable same-store sales rose by .3% both globally and for the
sizzling of rhode island, congressman hank johnson of georgia, and congresswoman jackowski of illinois, our distinguished democratic whip of steny hoyer, our ranking member on the small business committee. will formally introduce our witnesses, but i thank all of them for honoring us with their presence. we look forward to hearing your testimony. >> thank you. a member of the house republican is noship said "there appetite for extending unemployment benefits in the republican conference. today, we are not your to hear about appetite, but about hunger and about the hunger people across this country come a 1.3 million of them have for the dignity and the literal hunger these families will suffer on the 28th of december if benefits hunger extended, and the we should have as an economy for putting people back to work. the statements we will hear this morning will be more than ellen did. we look forward to getting back to work to extending unemployment benefits. >> thank you, madam leader. i want to welcome our guests here as well. it has been five years since the financial crisis precipitated a
it for former prime minister. it goes back to when president johnson lowered the flags for winston church hill. >>> coming up last night, florida state didn't just beat duke, it crushed them. check out the quarterback there heurdling over defense, touchdown, victory. highlights, upsets for all of saturday's big games. >> detained in north korea for more than a month, now an american war veteran returns home to the u.s. as a free man. we'll hear from him in his own words. , and animals. that's why we created the share the love event. by the end of this year, the total donated by subaru could reach 35 million dollars. you get a great deal on a new subaru. we'll donate 250 dollars to a choice of charities that benefit your community. it feels good to be a helping hand. [knock] no one was at home, but on the kitchen table sat three insurance policies. the first had lots of coverage. the second, only a little. but the third was... just right! bear: hi! yeah, we love visitors. that's why we moved to a secluded house in the middle of the wilderness. just the right coverage at just the right price. co
likely starting on sunday. veronica johnson is in the storm center. we are talking about the storm making its way through here. if you are traveling sunday morning, we are starting with snow and ice. it's a very dangerous combination. >> snow that could accumulate before the ice accumulates on top of it. this is a storm system that is one of the worst in quite some time. you can see it unfolding right now. doug mentioned the snow showing up in white around st. louis, missouri and areas of oklahoma. then icy conditions coming into spots like ohio. that's what will be moving this way the second half of the weekend. that ice with the cold air. we are going to have first is rain. you can see the weather front late this evening into areas of western pennsylvania. look at the moisture advancing ahead of it. by tomorrow morning, in fact after 3:00 a.m., we have a chance to see, the best chance of rain around the area. that means a wet morning rush but our heaviest rain comes during the evening rush. maybe a few pesky, showers tomorrow. most of it in the afternoon and evening. there's the weather
johnson has the latest from the storm center. >> i'm tracking it all. we have a couple things that we are going to have to warry about. the temperatures this time tomorrow, you are going to be uncomfortable. the mercury is going to drop. the other thing we are dealing with, folks, a lot of rain moving in. winter type weather for the weekend. that weather, i know, it's early. it includes snow that could accumulate and includes ice that could accumulate. we are looking at freezing rain and sleet around the area. temperatures right now, they are comfortable. mid-60s, most locations. with high that is topped out around 66 and 67 degrees in college park, rockville, maryland, gaithersburg, 65-66. it's more like late october type conditions. it's still going to be mild early tomorrow morning. likely to be able to get by. leave the house with a light jacket tomorrow. the warmest time of the day, in fact, will be early on. then we have showers to deal with, too, for the morning rush. it's going to be nasty and need the umbrella, not just for the morning but throughout the entire day. let me sh
asked us to carry out. i thank you you know that my time. >> thank you, ms. johnson. members can submit them for the record and they will appear at this point. or witness today's the honorable gina mccarthy, administrator of the environmental protection agency. prior to her appointment as administrator, she was the assistant administrator for epa's office of air and radiation or she advocated to protect public health and the environment. during her career, which spans over 30 years, she's the head with the state local levels on environmental issues and helps coordinate policies and academic growth, energy transportation and environment. administrator mccarthy received a bachelor virge degrees social anthropology from university of massachusetts and a masters of science and environmental health, engineering and planning are the tests university. at this time, i yield to the gentleman from connecticut for additional comments. >> thank you, chairman smith and ranking member johnson for holding today's hearing on the environmental protection agency. i'm very pleased gina mccarthy who served
looking for the historical angle. i can't help but think of lyndon johnson. he spent all those years, all those decades in congress and in the senate, going along, placating, doing the bidding of the conservative forces who controlled his immediate political future. this was the lyndon johnson who was the segregationist, but then when he got to the top, he became president, no one controlled him anymore. he was free to speak his mind and act on his conscience. this is the lyndon johnson who ended segregation. i find myself wondering if there is a little lbj in this pope, a conservative cardinal who infuriated the left in argentina and now as pope is becoming something of a liberal icon. here to make sense of who pope francis is and how he is shaping up our politics, we're joined by's benjy sarlin, sarah p posner, ana marie cox is still with us, and ambassador flynn as well. ambassador flynn, i'll start with you. you were an appointee of president clinton as the ambassador to the vatican. you are somebody who has fairly conservative views on the cultural issues. when you look at
is responsible? peter johnson, jr. on that next. ♪ ♪ >>> four people are dead and 11 still in critical condition after a horrific train derailment in new york city. the question now, can the railroad or can the city be held responsible? both or either? peter johnson, jr. here to explain the legal fallout. we know four lost their lives. over 60 injured. 11 in critical condition. >> metro north is the entity that's responsible for this. the people want to bring action for wrongful death and personal injury. they have 90 days to bring a notice of claim for that. at the same time, they will be a criminal -- there will be a criminal investigation to determine whether the operator or the engineer of the train was drunk in some way, was on drugs in some way, or acted in some criminally negligent fashion. i don't think that's going to happen. it doesn't appear to be any signs of that. but there is an issue as to brake. there have been some reports that the engineer of the train said that he dumped the brakes, that he used the braking pattern as if it was a crash at a railroad crossing, kind of a last-di
johnson when he described intelligence, he developed the memory of when he was milking a cow on the farm down at the river as a young man, and he said he would get the bucket filled with pure milk and then the cat would relieve itself in the milk. and president johnson said the relief -- and he met relief in the bad way -- that was intelligence. [laughter] so you can imagine how that hurt our feelings. [laughter] but there is another metaphor that i often hear and that is the famous woody allen comment that we in the intelligence community like to provide options to policymakers, and so we look out at the world and say, we are at a crossroads. one path leads to death and destruction, and the other path leads to total annihilation. [laughter] and we hope you policymakers would be able to the wisdom to choose the right course. but, in fact, in my experience and the spirits i think we're going to relate today on the balkans is that intelligence is, when it works well, a collaborative enterprise. fast capabilities to bring to the fight but also with clear limitations to be understood by lead
impeached. president clinton, president nixon and president johnson. so i add ad 3% bogey going from seven% to 10% because of incredible polarization taking place in the country itself. we know leadership is all about credibility. as a matter of fact the most recent poll that just came out only 54% of all americans,,3 excuse me, 54% of americans do not think the president is credible. the president was reelected on his likability and credibilitiness and that is quickly being dissipated. i also readily acknowledge most analysts will not remotely comment about politics just because of that we don't want to alienate potential clients and the like, but in my view not commenting about politics is equivalent to ignoring interest interest earnings and interest rates. >> your analysis is interesting. i want to say with all due respect, one in 10 chance sounds insane. if i knew there was one in 10 chance getting hit by a car i wouldn't walk across the street. that is more theoretical possibility. you're saying a guy who won a landslide election that face it as bad as obamacare is for a lot of peopl
the robert wood johnson university hospital where i serve on the board to be in total honesty area because we have a lot of experience but he also had to take care of patients today. so he did share some thoughts and are there any physicians in the house? very good. so we have some physicians in the house that mean he would like to respond to that. but this notion that carol raised and then linda, too, about this tug of war and this includes nurse practitioners and physician's assistants to my understanding getting involved in this, too. we want to admit the person and we understand that this is great to be a financial burden and clinically this person should be in admission, but it's going to be challenged and there will be financial ramifications for the hospital and one of the things i will add and maybe a physician can say something about this that the physician payment is not effective. maybe it's like $5 less. whether you are an advocate patient or an observation patient. so there isn't any particular financial incentives to try to spend the extra time, the paperwork, the burdens it tak
after her death until thomas h. johnson came along and found her in the library in 1935 and suddenly this complete unknown and people have this really great stuff. again, i don't want to necessarily make a hierarchy of text, but i will say there's some text that identifiably, the same with narratives. i think it's right that, for example, frederick douglass and harry jacobs did they really do stand out intrinsically a little more than -- i read some of these narratives. there's a lot of thickness and energy and subversive energy in those two spectrums in particular and certain other works, were some of the others are very interesting and important in their own way, that may be lacking density a richness that you do find in frederick douglass. so anyway. >> some texts are better than others. i am not [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> and however and dirt outside. the thing is kind of throw it out there and hope for the best. when i published a conviction back back in 81, price books back in. it's about 300 or 350, something like that. they can barely sell it to libraries. the pri
you, mr. speaker. i rise today to honor my fastest constituent, jimmie johnson, who recently won his sixth nascar sprint cup championship. in a remarkable display of teamwork, consistency and a burning desire to always improve, jimmie johnson won six nascar championships in the last eight years. more importantly, jimmy is a champion off the track. since 2006, the jimmie johnson foundation has contributed more than $5 million to charity with a special focus on improving k-12 education in north carolina, oklahoma and california. mr. pittenger: in charlotte, jimmy is a supporter of -- jimmi sembings a supporter of project -- jimmie is a supporter of project lift, improving the graduation rate in some of charlotte's toughest neighborhoods. thank you, jimmie, for using your ontrack success to make a lasting impact in the lives of thousands of children. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks and addr
. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. johnson: mr. speaker, at a time when americans continue to see their health care options diminish by the president's disastrous health care law, it's critical that we work to return choice and freedom to the american people. that's why i introduced h.r. 3498, a commonsense bill that gives seniors the freedom to make their own health care decisions and opt out of medicare. if folks like warren buffett or ross perreault want to opt out of medicare part a because they don't want or need a government entitlement paying for their care, we should let them. this bill truly tells seniors, if you like your current coverage you can keep it without the risk of losing other benefits like social security. seniors want, need and deserve the right to choose a health care plan that fits their needs. i urge my colleagues to join my efforts in returning freedom and choice to american seniors. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from ohio seek reco
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)